H.P. Lovecraft’s THE CALL OF CTHULHU podcast

I recently joined a very special line-up to talk about one of the most influential speculative stories of all time — the story whose creepy, tentacley touch everyone has felt, even if they don’t know it. “When the stars were right, They could plunge from world to world through the sky; but when the stars were wrong,[…]

SFF Audio Podcast: Martian Time Slip by Philip K Dick.

Jesse Willis recently invited Paul Weimar (SFF writer/reviewer/podcaster) and me on to the SFF Audio Podcast for a fun conversation about Philip K Dick’s 1964 novel Martian Time Slip. Follow the link to see some more of the beautiful illustrations, collected by Jesse from the original version of this novel (originally titled We Are Marsmen). Martian Time Slip is a super-weird, creepy, and funny book–definitely[…]

Review: Philip K. Dick, A Maze of Death

My review of Philip K. Dick’s A Maze of Death is up over at SFF Audio. This was one of those books that started off weird, got weirder, and ended weird, and got better the more I thought about it. It’s probably not the best title to start with if you are not already familiar[…]

“Eight O’Clock in the Morning” by Ray Nelson

SFF Audio do some seriously good readings of classic short stories. Check out episode #146 for the brilliant story “Eight O’ Clock in the Morning” (read by the talented Greg Margarite). It’s followed by a discussion with the author, Ray Nelson, who talks about story-craft, writing porn for hire, giving Phillip K. Dick acid trips, and hanging[…]

The first ever science fiction movie

My sister and I have embarked on a science fiction-movie bender this week, and one of the gems she introduced me to was A Trip to the Moon, the first SF movie ever, directed by the amazing Georges Méliès. The Wikipedia gods tell me the movie was based on two novels, H.G. Wells’ The First Men on the[…]

Thomas More’s “Utopia”

As a way to learn more about the history of science fiction, I am reading my way through some of the classics. This week, I read Utopia, by Sir Thomas More, (which, btw, you can get for free from the awesome folk at Project Gutenberg). Utopia, which Thomas More published way back in 1535, was the first[…]

Science-Fiction Exhibition in London

Lucky you if you live in (the safe parts) of London town: the British Library are hosting an exhibition called “Out of this World” that looks at the history and culture of science fiction. If you, like me, are too far away to visit the London exhibition in person, don’t worry – their website has a bunch[…]